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Guaraná Legend
An indian couple, belonging to the Maués tribe, lived together for many years, always wishing that they could have a child. One day they asked the god Tupã to give them a child as a present to complete their happiness. Tupã, the king of the gods, knowing that the couple had good hearts, fulfilled their wish, bringing to them a beautiful boy.
Time passed by quickly and the boy grew up handsome, generous and kind. However, Juruparí, the god of the darkness, felt an extreme envy for the boy and the peace and happiness that he transmitted, and decided to end that blooming life.
One day the boy went to gather fruits in the forest and Juruparí decided that his vengeance time had arrived. He transformed himself into a serpent and bit the boy, killing him instantly.
The sad news spread quickly. At this moment, thunder echoed and a lightening bolt fell near the indian longhouse. The mother, who was crying in despair, understood that the thunder was a message from Tupã, explaining that she should plant the child’s eyes and that from them a new plant would grow, yielding tasty fruits.
The indians obeyed the mother’s voice and planted the boy’s eyes. There grew the guaraná, whose seeds are black, each with a white aril around it, that reminds one of a human eye.
Guara = human being na = similar, alike
(source: Sumaúma)

Guaraná Legend

An indian couple, belonging to the Maués tribe, lived together for many years, always wishing that they could have a child. One day they asked the god Tupã to give them a child as a present to complete their happiness. Tupã, the king of the gods, knowing that the couple had good hearts, fulfilled their wish, bringing to them a beautiful boy.

Time passed by quickly and the boy grew up handsome, generous and kind. However, Juruparí, the god of the darkness, felt an extreme envy for the boy and the peace and happiness that he transmitted, and decided to end that blooming life.

One day the boy went to gather fruits in the forest and Juruparí decided that his vengeance time had arrived. He transformed himself into a serpent and bit the boy, killing him instantly.

The sad news spread quickly. At this moment, thunder echoed and a lightening bolt fell near the indian longhouse. The mother, who was crying in despair, understood that the thunder was a message from Tupã, explaining that she should plant the child’s eyes and that from them a new plant would grow, yielding tasty fruits.

The indians obeyed the mother’s voice and planted the boy’s eyes. There grew the guaraná, whose seeds are black, each with a white aril around it, that reminds one of a human eye.

Guara = human being na = similar, alike

(source: Sumaúma)

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    In fact, the fruit is consumed in the form of cold drinks or soda. The guarana soda is delicious and one of the most...
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